Privacy

Is Facebook Killing Privacy Softly? The Impact of Facebook’s Default Privacy Settings on Online Privacy

Facebook has rapidly become one of the most dominant websites on the planet and now boasts over 600 million active user accounts. The site provides users with a platform through which they can share large amounts of personal information, but this functionality, by its very nature, involves an erosion of personal privacy. Facebook has significantly revised its privacy policy over its six-year existence, establishing more intrusive default settings and reducing user control. In light of these changes, Michael J. Kasdan argues that users and regulators alike must continue to monitor the conduct of social networking companies and carefully weigh the benefits of increased interconnectivity against the costs of reduced privacy.

You May Not “Like” This Title: Everything Stored on Facebook Is Discoverable

Facebook has revolutionized the way that people communicate and do business by providing an open and connected environment for individuals and businesses alike. This openness has largely contributed to both its popularity and success. However, enjoying the openness of this revolutionary platform may come at an unexpected cost, especially for those who do not understand how the website’s content may be used as evidence in a lawsuit. Darren Heitner demonstrates how content published on a person’s Facebook account may be discoverable for the purposes of litigation, even when the information sought is unavailable through Facebook’s privacy settings.